Web Exploitation Engine 0.1 Release

So, you might remember my short writeup on exploiting command injection vulnerabilities – http://insecurety.net/?p=403 – and note that the tool used, GWEE, was a bit outdated and often would not compile correctly on modern versions of Linux using GCC.

Had you ever messed with the tool, you might also notice one of the authors was Sabu, so as a matter of principle, I was going to avoid using it whenever possible.

So, many attempts were made at re-implementing the tool in Python, most of them absolute failures, totally rubbish, or otherwise “clunky” and inelegant.

Anyways, much messing about later, I stumbled across a piece of code by @LaNMaSteR53 named “rce.py”. You can download it here: rce.py (the original one).

My main problem when writing my implementations (prior to seeing LaNMaSteR53’s implementation) was handling the POST data. How the hell would I get it from the commandline to the tool itself without having the user editing some config file of some kind. To me, this was a major stumbling block.

So, when I saw Tim’s implementation, passing it “just like a GET, but telling the parser it was POST”, I had to borrow it. A quick bit of replacing the urllib stuff with requests.get and requests.post, and I had a decent base to build from.

While the retooled version of rce.py itself was pretty cool as it was, I felt it could be taken a lot further. The original beta had built in reverse shells (12 or so varieties), however it tended to crash and such a lot. No error handling whatsoever, and some of the payloads simply failed to function at all.

Eventually, I wrote the “payloads” module. A slimmed down version of it is included in the wee.tar.bz2 archive, as I have not finished the thing yet. Currently the public release contains only a python reverse shell, however it is extremely easy to expand upon.

Anyway, on with the show.

we.py has only one mandatory arguement, the –url arg. You simply (for a GET request, the default), put in –url=’http://victim.com/vuln?vuln=<rce>&otherparams=otherparams’
For a POST request, you put them in just like a GET request, and specify –method=post as an argument to tell the tool to parse them as POST parameters.

By default, it gives you the “rce.py” style inline shell prompt. However, using the –shell argument, you can specify it to use a reverse shell instead like so: –shell=reverse.

By default, the reverse shell will use 127.0.0.1 and 4444 as its lhost and lport, so you can change this with –lhost=LHOST and –lport=LPORT.

So, here is a screenshot of it in action:

Poppin' shells

Poppin’ shells

This tool is still being developed, so report any bugs you find in it and make suggestions :)

You may download it here: wee.tar.bz2 :)

Remember, use with care, etc.