Android Application Reverse Engineering. Reversing Angry Birds.

Ok, sick so this article has been a long time coming.

One of my pastimes is reverse engineering Android applications, just to see “what makes them tick”. In this article, in order to really drive this home, I will reverse engineer the popular “Angry Birds” application.

Due to time constraints and basic laziness, sovaldi I went for the first APK I could find – Angry Birds in Space.

Also, before anyone asks, in the following article I will NOT be releasing the Angry Birds source code. I simply am using it as a demo :)

First off, you will want to have the Unix “unzip” utility installed. We will be using this to unpack the .apk file.

Second, grab the following pieces of software:
dex2jar – http://code.google.com/p/dex2jar/ – for converting the .dex file into a .jar file :)
and
jd-gui – http://java.decompiler.free.fr/?q=jdgui – For decompiling the (.jar) Java file into its (.java) source code :)

Now, the idea behind this article is NOT to teach you to crack apps. Instead, this is the skillset needed to reverse engineer Android Malware – as seen in my previous post – http://insecurety.net/?p=637

So. You have your .apk file, the first thing we do is use the GNU Unzip utility to unpackage it!

$ unzip Angry_Birds_Space_Premium_1.3.0.apk

Next, use the d2j-dex2jar.sh utility from dex2jar to convert classes.dex to a JAR file.

$ ./dex2jar-0.0.9.9/d2j-dex2jar.sh classes.dex

Screenshot of the above 2 steps (I piped output to /dev/null to avoid MASSIVE SPAM OF DATA)

unzip and dex2jar

Next, we simply open the .JAR file using jd-gui.

Decompiling the JAR file

Finally we can simply export the source code from jd-gui for our viewing, and editing pleasure :)

So. In conclusion

  • Android applications are trivial to reverse engineer
  • Software for decompiling them is readily available
  • Fun times :D

 

Quick Post: Initial Analysis of “LuckyCat” APT Android Malware

First off, view I have not been writing as often as I like lately. Have a bunch of nice things half written, and no time at present to finish the damn things due to college. Anyway, online on with the show!

So I was browsing the Contagio Mobile Malware Dump and came across this: http://contagiominidump.blogspot.ie/2012/08/luckycata-android-apt-malware.html#more

I was intrigued. The “LuckyCat” APT people had come on my radar before for their elegant use of incredibly low-tech methods (old exploits, sickness very simplistic malware).

So, I decided to dissect this thing. Using Dex2Jar, Unzip and JD-GUI, I was able to quickly reduce the .apk to its source code (Java, ugh) and poke around.

Trend Micro had previously shown it seemed to have file manager functionality, remote command execution, and possibly phonebook theft features. So I decided to go look at its C&C.

I eventually found the following code in the “CMainControl.java” class:
private String strReIP = “greenfuns.3322.org”;
private String strRePort = “54321”;

Now, this lead me to think “So, it connects to that host on that port… Interesting”.

An nslookup shows this no longer seems to exist:
$ nslookup greenfuns.3322.org
Server:        192.168.1.254
Address:    192.168.1.254#53

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:    greenfuns.3322.org
Address: 10.0.0.101

3322.org is, unless I am mistaken, a dynamic DNS provider.  A whois shows it to be China based, as expected.

While going over the source, I noticed a few strings with Chinese characters in them, further giving me the opinion this is another Chinese APT type threat thingy.

I did not, unfortunately, have time for anymore screwing with this, so without further ado, here is the download link to the malware and decompiled source. Password for zip files is “infected”, where needed.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/bbj2y6w9zku10vw/LuckyCat-Android-Malware.zip